Friday, February 7, 2014

Quick wins for local councils and disabled people

Background

The RNIB, as a national organisation representing more than 15,000 members and campaigners, was acutely aware that disabled people across the country stood to be amongst the hardest hit by the cuts in public spending.

Almost two million people in the UK have a sight problem which has a serious impact on their daily lives. The vast majority of these people rely on a core bedrock of services – e.g. accessible information or support with getting around or regaining employment – in order to live independently. Much of this support is provided by local councils.

These services are not luxuries, and often don’t cost much. Yet if withdrawn the impact on people’s lives can be dramatic. At the same time the RNIB knew that to make the case for even modest continued investment, they needed independent evidence of impact, and practical recommendations – which is where OPM came in.

What we did

A wide range of RNIB members from nine places across England were invited to take part in the research, including young and old people with different backgrounds and experiences.

The research included focus groups, in-depth ethnographic interviews to ‘tell the story’ of a day in the life of a blind or partially sighted person, and three participative case studies exploring the good work three local authorities were doing (Leicester, Plymouth and South Tyneside).

OPM and the RNIB launched the report based on the findings from the research at the national Local Government Association conference, with speakers including the (then) leader of South Tyneside Council.

Social impact

The research went a considerable way to achieving its aim of raising awareness of the practical steps needed to improve outcomes for disabled people when the findings were covered by The Guardian, as well as in local papers where the research had taken place.

Since the launch of the report the RNIB has continued to work with a network of local authorities to encourage and support them to adopt best practice like the innovations showcased by the research.

Friday, February 7, 2014

Will the Met Police’s New Approach to Conducting Stop and Search Help Rebuild Public Trust?

The government’s policy on stop and search is once again under the spotlight. In the aftermath of inquest into Mark Duggan’s shooting, the police, Home Office and home secretary have all spoken about the need for a fairer and less divisive stop and search policy.

A further Home Office announcement on the future of stop and search is widely expected in the coming weeks. This is to be welcomed. Having recently completed research on young Londoners’ experiences and perceptions of stop and search for the London Assembly Police and Crime Committee, it is clear that the way stop and search is working on the ground, and how it is perceived by communities, could be further improved.

Read the full article on The Huffington Post website.

Saturday, February 1, 2014

The Sure Start Children’s Centres Community Management Support programme

In September 2012, the Department for Education funded 4Children to deliver the Sure Start Children’s Centres Community Management (Sure Start CCCMS programme), which was aimed at increasing parental and community involvement in children’s centres. Through the Sure Start CCCMS programme, 4Children provided support to ten groups of parents and community members to help them bid to run their local children’s centre, or build their capacity to do so. Each group had a dedicated business advisor who delivered a tailored package of support depending on the individual needs of the group. The groups received support from September 2012 to September 2013.

OPM was commissioned to carry out an independent evaluation of  4Children’s Sure Start CCCMS programme.

Thursday, October 31, 2013

Impact Evaluation of the SEND Pathfinder Programme

OPM was commissioned by the Department for Education as part of consortium lead by SQW, and including Ipsos MORI and BPSR, to undertake the evaluation of the SEND Green Paper Pathfinder Programme.

The main aims of the independent evaluation were to establish if approaches developed by the pathfinders:

Thursday, April 11, 2013

Review of the Family Fund Trust Research Report

In April 2012, the Department for Education commissioned the Moorhouse Consortium (including  OPM and Cognizant) to undertake a rapid review of the Family Fund Trust (FFT). The review, carried out between April 2012 and July 2012, had five main objectives:
1. To compare the efficiency and cost effectiveness of the current Family Fund model with
alternative delivery models
2. To assess the process of awareness raising with families and allocation and distribution of
funds
3. To identify the short and long term impact of initial and repeat funding on families
4. To measure the qualitative impact of home visits
5. To review the appropriateness of the role of UK Government as a direct grant provider.

Thursday, June 21, 2012

Quick wins…and missed opportunities

How local authorities can work with blind and partially sighted people to build a better future.

This report, based on a major programme of RNIB research carried out by the independent public interest company OPM, shows that:

Monday, January 30, 2012

Evaluation of Sacred Spaces programme

OPM were commissioned to conduct an evaluation of Sacred Spaces, a pilot programme run by Curriculum Enhancement for the Common Era (CE4CE) and funded by Creativity Culture and Education (CCE) which aimed to deliver creative and cultural learning in supplementary school settings.

Sunday, September 4, 2011

Involving children and young people in health services

Children and young people are key stakeholders of the NHS and their interests must be at the centre of health and local government services. To generate a consensus across child health professionals in the NHS and local government, the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and the NHS Confederation, with support from the Office for Public Management, held an event in September 2011 to discuss the key priorities for child health and the reforms.

Sunday, September 4, 2011

Children and young people’s health – where next?

Children and young people are key stakeholders of the NHS and their interests must be at the centre of health and local government services. To generate a consensus across child health professionals in the NHS and local government, the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and the NHS Confederation, with support from the Office for Public Management, held an event in September 2011 to discuss the key priorities for child health and the reforms.

 

Monday, June 6, 2011

ecdp Briefing Paper 4 – Attitudes to risk in using personal budgets

In 2008 Essex County Council (ECC) commissioned OPM and ecdp to do a longitudinal study of people receiving cash payments for adult social care in Essex. This is one of a series of briefing papers containing findings from the second annual round of research with service users, frontline practitioners and providers in Essex.