Monday, September 19, 2016

Evaluation of the Wandsworth End of Life Care Coordination Centre

The Wandsworth Care Coordination Centre was designed to address confusion among patients and their families about who to contact for help and support, due to the range of organisations involved in caring for someone approaching the end of their life.

It comprises a 7 day nurse-led coordination team and helpline for patients, families and professionals based at Trinity; a dedicated St George’s End of Life Community Nurse; and a team of Marie Curie Health and Personal Care Assistants who can offer specialised hands-on care at home for people with any terminal illness.

This evaluation ran from October 2015 to June 2016 and explores the impact of the centre on patients, families and professionals, the cost savings and other forms of value offered by the centre as well as the lessons learned through implementation.

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Evaluation of the Reducing Social Isolation and Loneliness Grant Fund

The Reducing Social Isolation and Loneliness Grant programme was commissioned and funded by North, Central and South Manchester Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), and administered and managed by Manchester Community Central (Macc). OPM Group evaluated the programme over 2013-16 and produced this final report and report summary.

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Qualitative research into Registration Assessment performance among Black-African candidates

This General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) report explores the experiences and performances of Black-African candidates in the Registration Assessment. For this work we held depth, qualitative interviews and focus groups with Black-African trainees and recently registered pharmacists and interviews with people who are involved in pharmacist education and training.

The research concludes by suggesting some actions which may help improve the experience and performance of some Black-African trainees and at the same time offer benefits to all pharmacy students and trainees, and ultimately to the pharmacy profession.

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Models of Care in Motor Neurone Disease

This report for the Motor Neurone Disease Association (MND Association) explores the different ways MND care is organised across the UK. It examines the practical arrangement of MND care, such as how multi-disciplinary teams are constituted and the relationship between hospital and community services. The report provides advice for the NHS and social services on how to organise MND care effectively.

Monday, June 20, 2016

Reading Hack evaluation interim report

Reading Hack is an innovative Reading Agency programme funded by the Paul Hamlyn Foundation. Launched in 2015, the programme works with young people aged 13-24 across England to create opportunities for reading-inspired activity, volunteering roles and peer-to-peer reading advocacy.

This is the interim report from a three year evaluation of Reading Hack to understand its impact on the young people and organisations taking part, as well as exploring more widely what works when engaging young people with reading.

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

New evaluation of STEM Learning Triple Science Support Programme

We have just completed a two-year evaluation project for STEM Learning (a national body providing schools with continuous professional development in science, technology, engineering, and maths), looking into the impact of the Triple Science Support Programme (TSSP) in 2014-2016. The TSSP supports schools to develop their triple science provision at GCSE level. In our evaluation we spoke to teachers and delivery staff, and found that the TSSP has helped schools make considerable improvements in their triple science provision. We found the project had a range of positive impacts, including raising subject teachers’ confidence; improving science departments’ capacity and capability to teach triple science; and outcomes for students such as improved motivation, and progress and attainment in triple science. Download the full report here.

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Our work with the Royal College of Nursing to showcase the costs and benefits of nurse-led innovation

With funding from the Burdett Trust for Nursing, we have been working in partnership with the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) to build nursing capability in economic assessment and to help nurses demonstrate the value of nurse-led innovation in practice. In April we held a breakfast event jointly with the RCN and Hospice UK, Demonstrating the value of nurse-led innovations in End of Life Care, which shines a light on nurses working in hospice and care home settings. The full video of the event – including presentations from Dr. Chih Hoong Sin (OPM), Dr. Ann McMahon (RCN) and Antonia Bunnin (Hospice UK), not to mention case studies from practitioners themselves – can be accessed via here.

For any questions regarding this partnership or our economic evaluation work, please contact Chih Hoong on csin@opm.co.uk

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Evaluation of the Reducing Social Isolation and Loneliness Grant Programme

Social isolation and loneliness in older people is a widespread issue that has gained much attention in recent years. We know that being isolated and lonely can impact on a person’s quality of life and lead to more intensive use of health and social care services.  

In Manchester the three Clinical Commissioning Groups provided grant funding targeted to reduce social isolation and loneliness amongst Manchester residents aged 50+. Grants were awarded to voluntary sector organisations to deliver 27 projects across the city. The Programme ran from September 2014 until March 2016 and was managed by Manchester Community Central (Macc).

OPM was commissioned to evaluate the Grant Programme. The evaluation sought to demonstrate outcomes and provide evidence around ‘what works and why’.

This presentation was delivered at the final Programme celebration event attended by representatives from the CCGs, other North West CCGs, Manchester City Council, Macc, local research organisations, plus VCS leads and volunteers from across the city. It presents the headline findings from the evaluation and showcases two projects in depth. Our final evaluation report will be available in the coming months.

Click here to download the presentation slides.

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Evaluation of the Reducing Social Isolation and Loneliness Grant Programme

Social isolation and loneliness in older people is a widespread issue that has gained much attention in recent years. We know that being isolated and lonely can impact on a person’s quality of life and lead to more intensive use of health and social care services.

In Manchester the three Clinical Commissioning Groups provided grant funding targeted to reduce social isolation and loneliness amongst Manchester residents aged 50+. Grants were awarded to voluntary sector organisations to deliver 27 projects across the city. The Programme ran from September 2014 until March 2016 and was managed by Manchester Community Central (Macc).

OPM was commissioned to evaluated the Grant Programme. The evaluation sought to demonstrate outcomes and provide evidence around ‘what works and why’.

This presentation was delivered at the final Programme celebration event attended by representatives from the CCGs, other North West CCGs, Manchester City Council, Macc, local research organisations, plus VCS leads and volunteers from across the city. It presents the headline findings from the evaluation and showcases two projects in depth. Our final evaluation report will be available in the coming months.

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

British Sign Language Broadcasting Trust

The British Sign Language Broadcasting Trust (BSLBT) was established to increase the amount of sign-presented programming on digital terrestrial television. It commissions content made in BSL by Deaf people for Deaf people and offers an alternative for broadcasters in meeting requirements for the provision of sign language on their channels.

In November 2014 BSLBT commissioned OPM to conduct a review on the Deaf audience in the UK – people whose first or preferred language is British Sign Language. The purpose of this research was to understand more about the highly marginalised Deaf community, with regards to demographics and language use, as well as life issues such as integration into the wider world, health status and access to health services, and use and views of television and the internet. The findings will assist BSLBT in using its resources cost effectively to provide future television programming for the Deaf community. It is also hoped the report will add to the wider world’s understanding of the life experience of Deaf people and the issues Deaf people face.

You can download the executive summary, full report, and appendices on this page. You can also watch a BSL version of the executive summary on the BSLBT website.