Thursday, April 1, 2010

Personalisation of universal services: Library and information services

Whilst the term ‘personalisation’ is not in common use in library and information services, the work that libraries have undertaken to ensure their services are socially inclusive demonstrate how library and information services (LIS) can be personalised.

The Department for Culture Media and Sport recognises tackling social exclusion as one of the three main tasks of the LIS.

‘The following three areas of activity …. the heart of libraries’ modern mission:

Measures to tackle social exclusion, build community identity and develop citizenship.

Saturday, October 31, 2009

Leadership of place: light touch mapping

The Improvement and Development Agency for local government (IDeA), the Leadership Centre for Local Government, the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement, and the National Police Improvement Agency (NPIA) jointly commissioned OPM to conduct research into current activity around leadership of place.

The research used interviews and a review of documents to map current activity and identify options for possible future collaboration. Interviewees included key stakeholders across the four organisations, academics and other experts who have worked in this area, and the directors of a number of the regional improvement and efficiency partnerships.

Friday, July 31, 2009

Understanding the relationship between NHS and Chairs and Chief Executives

The nature of the relationship between the Chair and the Chief Executive can have a significant impact on an organisation but there has been little recent research on the quality of this relationship within NHS organisations.

In 2009 the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement commissioned OPM (Office for Public Management) to improve our knowledge and understanding of how these relationships work; what makes them effective and what can cause a relationship to go wrong. The research involved a review of the recent literature relating to Chair-Chief Executives relationships in the NHS and other sectors and qualitative interviews (face to face) with over 40 Chairs and Chief Executives from a full range of NHS organisations.

The research identified two key ways in which chairs and chief executives view their relationships; ‘co-action’ focused on interpersonal features and ‘counter action’ focused on tasks. It also identified behaviours judged as being important by participants for a successful relationship, factors that contribute to the breakdown of a relationship and the impact of the relationship on the organisation.

The study also considered how the NHS Institute can best support Chairs and Chief Executives in establishing and maintaining effective relationships. The report includes recommendations about the type of support that may be helpful to those looking to strengthen their relationships.


Friday, August 26, 2005

The Future of Unpaid Care in Scotland

This is a report of an event held on 26 August 2005 at Murrayfield Stadium, as part of the research on the future of unpaid care in Scotland, undertaken by OPM, and commissioned by Care 21, a social work innovation unit located within the Social Work Services Policy Services Division of the Scottish Executive.